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their christian religion, others followed their muslim religion, and others their african superstitions. for me, this went to the heart of why the book was inevitable, or why, for me, i was engaged this this discourse all my life. it's very strange. i found it very interesting today, close to 80, i should actually exist in an environment in which for admitting what i believe or for believing what i do not believe to be considered of what i call terminal censorship. now, go back to the history, and i don't mean just me personally. i'm talking about the society in which i live, in which i was raised, the history of my people as i now write in the book, when the european explorers, of course, always quickly followed by religious storm troopers, the missionaries came to africa on the mission of conversion, they had a very serious problem, and that was they could not find satan. they couldn't find the denver. now, if you want to convert people, you have to persuade them that they -- that their soul is in dire danger, that they are headed for the ultimate bonfire on the other side of existence. from
that government may not substantially burden the free exercise of religion without it extremely wait of public interest. and i defend those ideas. the second prong of my approach is for consistency and a self examination in our approach to the religion of other people. many policies lack the basic virtue to have a coherent and consistent policy across similar cases. many are flawed in a deeper way people act in ways to give there group special privileges. so we will see that but the third prong i argue even with good principles and consisting reasoning we still need something more. active, a curious imagination learned about the lives of others and coming to see how the world looks from other points of view i give works of literature from both adults come to children to promote the a understanding. i use the history of prejudice as a historical case that is good to think about. for the 19th century antisemitism it has the unfortunate features and the obvious wrongness may guide us as we think of issues that are too close to be seen with a clarity deserved. but now with second prong and princip
protection to religion in the u.s. constitution. this interview part of booktv's college series was recorded at the university of pennsylvania will -- pennsylvania. it's about 20 minutes. >> university of pennsylvania professor sarah gordon, "the spirit of the law" is her most recent book. what do you mean when you talk about the old constitutional world and the new constitutional world when it comes to religion? >> guest: well, for most of her nation's history with the states rather than federal government that controlled access to religious worship, the rights of religious organization and so on, and in the early decades of the 20 century that began to shift. the supreme court applied the national constitutional establishment and exercise clauses of the first amendment against the state, sort of centralizing debates about religion. >> host: but if the states for control, we had it written into our constitution, freedom of religion. >> guest: we did indeed that the first amendment began, congress shall i not know love so it was addressed only to the national government. >> host: were ther
and animosity with the wars of religion but also colonial religious domination by europeans and added to that anti-catholicism that implicated not only germany but other nations as well year in the u.s. like to think those times are in the past and religious violence was somewhere else and characterized by christian values. today we have many reasons to doubt that. searching for critical self examination as we have the ear and suspicion to disfigure all democracy. april 2011 in france it is illegal to cover the face from parks to the marketplace of local law does not mention the word winded, and muslim or fail or burqa but it was a band on veiling but it did threatens french values of dignity and equality. although france is a good country to put the ban on the burqa in public space but it is being considered all over europe in many have adopted restrictions. april 28, 2011 belgium voted for a similar ban although it is expected to be challenged. spain 2010 the catalonia and assembly nearly rejected the ban on the burqa reid -- reversing an earlier vote. similar votes are in progress
of the 20th century. he did not in the end adopt some foreign religion. he adopted his own religion, that of his ancestors. similarly, we don't have to seek to have islamist convert to what is to them a foreign religion, but rather an islam of their own ancestors, one and poisoned by the extremism we associate with wahhabism and al qaeda. the problem for us is that christianity was very much part of western culture and something that we were knowledgeable about and suited to fight over. islam is different. is hard for our government to be effective with the struggle of that religion. i just want to also note by the way ,-com,-com ma because charlie mentioned an awful, the journey. "witness" was one of the greatest autobiographical groups on extremism. perhaps one of the greatest novels about it. and they had great political impacts in part because they were great literary works, works of art. there are some islamic works about breaking with extremism. the islamist by ed hussein, radical i -- but i don't think there are any such works that are great works of art scene from the point
religion you are, what economic class you're in, what your gender is or theoretically, at least, what your sexual orientation is. at least that's the way it's supposed to be. certainly, most libertarians already get that, and i think that why they have a sp
and religion" i just want to say a few words of the subject matter to be discussed today were the of what became a years of endeavor and peter bergen will be your host and moderator today. catherine unfortunately is not here to the -- today but is a:editor about the taliban and its environment southern afghanistan, and western pakistan. to get at them itself when the united states was puzzling over its resurgence in afghanistan as a military challenge that had been neglected in the years after the 2001 arab emirates that it presented itself as a grave dilemma to the obamacare administration so we try to provide the regularity about this phenomenon recognizing the cliche image of the of one i aid malaya and his band of fanatics was inaccurate and falsified the problem. said not to prosecute a particular view of the taliban but look at its diversity and aspects of the character fetter not part of american debate to. i am really proud of this book and peter whose leadership from new america has been a joy in my office to support him and watch him. the last thing i want to talk -- that i want
or other with the issue of religion in human life, in politics, and in social life. this is including a book on the difficulty journalists frequently have in properly understanding religion as a motive in events, and the book, itself, is called "blind spot" don't together with roberta, and my colleague, who is here today, paul marshall, published by oxford press and won several literary prizes. it's also included work on a book entitled a table in the presence which was written by lieutenant commander kerry cash which concerns his experiences as a chaplain in combat in iraq. another portion of her work, also within the general area of religion, has focused on the fate of christians around the world, and in particular, their prevails in recent years. this included the award winning "their blood cries out," also co-authoredded with paul marshall, and "eyewitness to a broken world," and cox is a distinguished member of the house of lords, famous as a campaigner for human rights and for christian rights. there will also be out fairly soon another book called "persecuted: the global assaul
.s. -- religious freedom. the role of religion and the narratives that the afghan taliban offering the pakistani taliban offer often couched in militant terms, does that play with the populations of taliban -- talibanistan and something that brings something closer to them or is it just political verbiage with a different addressing? >> answers have to be like 30 seconds please. sorry. we have got to wrap it up. >> in the case of police, the reason there was not investment and police in pakistan is because of sheer incompetence. of course that leads to lack of political will. i will also criticize the government as well as the pakistan government. in 2001 to 2008 the u.s. started looking at the police is an important institution. but why from 2001 to 2000 adobe's departments and organizations in the u.s. never talked about counterterrorism as a civil law issue. >> a good point. >> there are elements of the taliban who believe this is the right time to negotiate because they don't think that the '90s taliban will be reconstituted. there are others who disagree with that, but that is essentially w
. there is some economic fate that he basically made up his own religion and wrote this really weird book called something like this secret history of the universe as revealed through a cult science in the troy, michigan, which i almost used for my title. [laughter] so just to tell the story very quickly, he and his entire family were brutally, gruesomely murdered. they were beheaded and his children were killed as well and it was this big sensational story at the time. you can go through the free press archives and plan on this coverage. and it was never solved. at a certain point i realized it was not far from where i was living over in eastern market. so what to check it out for his house was is just a field now. i just kind of filed it away. weirdly enough, probably a year later, there was another murder, almost literally across the street. it was the drug thing and these kids were trying to scare -- two rival drug houses in this zone and these two teenagers were trying to scare off their rivals and so to do this, i ended up killing them horribly dismembering this guy come in the this random
the issue between franco and the vatican which made every other religion illegal -- i begin that chapter with a funny story, really. it was funny -- it's not funny. i'm in a bar up in northern spain, and the guy's in the bar are -- the guys in the bar are trying to teach me how to pour the wonderful hard cider, which perhaps you know it, you know, and you hold -- yeah, right, now hold the bottle this way over your head, and you have a glass with a very big open glass pointing out this way, and the cider's supposed to come down, hit the outside of the glass and bounce in. i'm trying to do that, but most is running all over my pants and the floor. a little bit is going into the glass, and one of the guys says to me, and we're all pretty well drunk by this time, and the guy says to me, "are you catholic or atheist?" those were the -- those seemed to be the only possibilities. i said, no, no, i'm neither a catholic nor an atheist. no kidding. you must be protestant. why do you think that? everybody in the american government is protestant. well, no, that's not true either. john kennedy was n
your language and your religion, we will do it. but at the same time we're going to insist on our own identity as a mandate people. so you could say that there after the identity grew as a counterpoint to this idea that they should be, civilized highest christians. now, all of these tensions were on display because once the supreme court ruled in their favor, and said they could go home, well, the supreme court also ruled the united states government had no responsibility to pay for their going home so how were they going to get home? well, ma for the longest time people believed that some wealthy abolitionists would pay for this, but, in fact, what happened was the abolitionists with the cooperation of the amistad africans organize a big tour up and down the eastern seaboard in which the amistad africans would go and speak and perform, perform their knowledge of christianity, performed their knowledge of english, performed their civilization. and at the same time, they would insist on singing their native african songs. the african side was always there. and here's the wildest part o
and the freedom of religion. he is very much showing at this point why he is different and why his thinking is different and why rhode island is different from massachusetts, and the other colonies to the north. he was creating a land where people could come, could worship as they chose, and would always be protected by the civil law. roger williams, while he was a member of the clergy, was also incredible trained and learned in civil law and actually worked for circle in the british parliament. and we see a lot of his ideas of civil law in preparation of church and state. articulated in text like this but this did not of course sit well with england or with massachusetts. by an actor british parliament, all of the copies of this book were set to be burned. likely not all of them were. this copy was not an we're able to show that the people today. this didn't go unnoticed by people here in the colony. this next book has a contemporary binding, was a response to "the bloody tenent." the response, "the bloody tenent" made white in the blood of the land is response high cotton. it comes just a
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13

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